Otherwordly.

As dusk falls, fog over Mývatn embraces the iconic table mountains ringing it. This scene lasted but briefly before it was replaced by whiteout conditions.

Sellandafjall in fog

Sheep, Fog, Sellandafjall
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 
Bláfjall in fog

Bláfjall
5DS, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
 
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Old town Lisboa.

Janelas (windows) and Azulejos seen on an afternoon stroll through Alfama, the oldest quarter in Lisboa, Portugal.

In Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal

Pensive
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
In Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal

Azulejos de Alfama
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
In Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal

Janelas e Azulejos
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
In Alfama, Lisbon, Portugal

Three of a kind
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Bob_B - February 7, 2016 - 5:31 am

    Hi Rajan,

    Yet another wonderful set of photos. My personal favorite is Janelas e Azulejos because of the symmetry and lack of power lines and wires, but Pensive is powerful and provocative, different from the rest. Well done.

    BobReplyCancel

  • Mervyn - February 6, 2016 - 2:34 pm

    I have seen the first design carved into white marble forming a lattice divider for a room. The Taj Mahal has similar marble carvings. I can look at such designs for hours as when you change depth/focus – the picture changes entirely.ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - February 7, 2016 - 1:26 pm

      We have quite a few Azulejos in Goa, including the panels in the hallway of Institute Menezes Braganza in Panjim.ReplyCancel

Nature’s weaves.

Patterns recorded during an aerial excursion over the south-central Highlands of Iceland.

Glacial river, Highlands of Iceland

“Heart”
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
Canyons, Highlands of Iceland

“Fingers”
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Glacial river, Highlands of Iceland

“Handshake”
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
Gísli Björnsson and Sigrún Sævarsdóttir

My Cessna 207 crew: Gísli Björnsson and Sigrún Sævarsdóttir
5D Mark III, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Premanand - February 5, 2016 - 9:50 am

    ​Mother Nature produces fantastic art forms by the chaotic and random movements of the elements. I wonder whether these apparently chaotic activities are really random? Is there Someone up there Who actually has the control over some sort of “sliders” similar to LR…slide “Snow/Ice” slider to 80, “Glacier” slider to about 65, “Saturate” vegetation in summer to about 35 and voila, Iceland is ready. Now export this to North-Western Europe and save in the North-Atlantic Ocean folder. :-)ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - February 5, 2016 - 10:02 am

      Glacial river bed patterns (first and third images) change by the day, if not by the hour. You never know what you will find on any given day.ReplyCancel

  • Jackson Frishman - February 4, 2016 - 1:48 pm

    These are marvelous, Rajan! Especially Fingers!ReplyCancel

Founded in 1595, built in 1741.

One of Goa‘s oldest churches, photographed early morning. Considered to be in the “Mannerist Neo-Roman style with Rococo features.”1

[1] The Parish Churches of Goa by José Lourenço, Amazing Goa Publications, 2005.

St Alex church in Calangute, Goa

St. Alex Church in Calangute, Goa
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
 
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  • Premanand - January 28, 2016 - 12:10 pm

    St. Alex Church is as close to the hearts of us “Calangutekaars” as is the Shri Shanta Durga temple on “titon”. Rajan bhai, this post of yours warms the cockles of my heart and stirs some happy memories of my childhood which are associated with this place. Deo barren karoo!ReplyCancel

  • Sandesh Anvekar - January 27, 2016 - 8:16 pm

    Wonder if this too was built by razing some local hindu temple. Just curiousReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - January 27, 2016 - 9:29 pm

      Sandesh,

      Bardez suffered the most widespread iconoclasm of the early Portuguese conquests and almost all the major churches there were built on the sites of destroyed temples. That said, I should add that our churches do not invoke any negative feelings in me. Quite the opposite, in fact. I consider them part of our shared Goan heritage.ReplyCancel

A test of nerves and skill.

Landing an aircraft in Iceland‘s fjords can be an unnerving experience. Negotiating rapid changes in weather and visibility, especially the unforeseen wind gusts, demands a high level of skill. Icelandic pilots are very well trained to operate in these conditions.

Last year in March I was stranded for 3 days on the remote Strandir coast after a ferocious snow storm had rendered the only land route into the region impassable. See this post I made at the time. A once-a-week flight operated from Reykjavík into the area’s tiny airstrip at Gjögur was my only way out. Needless to add, I was the sole passenger on the return flight to Reykjavík.

These photographs were taken handheld on a cold and blustery afternoon as I waited for the aircraft (a Jetstream 31) to arrive.

Check out the slideshow below of the landing sequence.

Eagle Air plane landing at Gjögur airport, Iceland

Descent into Reykjarfjörður
5D Mark III, 100-400L IS II

 
Eagle Air plane landing at Gjögur airport, Iceland

The U-turn
5D Mark III, 100-400L IS II

 
Almost there5D Mark III, 100-400L IS II

Almost there
5D Mark III, 100-400L IS II

 
Eagle Air plane landing at Gjögur airport, Iceland

Touchdown at Gjögur
5D Mark III, 100-400L IS II

 

 
 
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  • Jono - January 26, 2016 - 12:48 pm

    I used to have a pilot’s license, but never had any desire to fly in those conditions.ReplyCancel