A troubled genius.

Yesterday I visited the grave of Bobby Fischer at Laugardælir Church, around 30 miles outside of Reykjavík, Iceland. I was a boy in shorts when the 1972 Bobby Fischer-Boris Spassky duel for the World Chess Championship captured the world’s imagination.

Bobby Fischer's grave at Laugardælir Church, Iceland

Bobby Fischer’s grave
iPhone 7

 
Laugardælir Church, Iceland

Laugardælir Church
iPhone 7

 

PS: Kasparov visits Fischer‘s grave.

 
 
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  • B. Colaco - September 19, 2017 - 3:55 am

    Interesting duels of our times. It was kind of cold war thing. There were also great boxing duels – Ali and the rest. Now a days all fake fights for the sake of money.

    Cumprimentos

    BCReplyCancel

Unmistakably Goa.

Both compositions were taken with a drone.

Fisherman in Murdi ward of Narve, Goa

Lone fisherman, in Narve
DJI Phantom 4

 
 
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  • Bob_B - September 15, 2017 - 12:38 pm

    So serene! The first one especially speaks to me. I can imagine the heat and humidity, and the sound of insects in the background. Well done Rajan.ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - September 15, 2017 - 2:26 pm

      Thanks, Bob. This was taken during the monsoon season when the humidity is high and the temperature is pleasant to tolerable.ReplyCancel

An evening to remember.

The iconic table mountain Sellandafjall in north Iceland is a personal favourite of mine. My friend Kristinn Ingi Péturson and I spent a blissful autumn evening two years ago on the banks of Sandvatn, captivated by the play of light on the mountain.

Sellandafjall, honey-dipped
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 
Last light on Sellandafjall seen from Sandvatn, Iceland

The giant whale basks in golden hues
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 
Rainbow at Sandvatn near Mývatn, Iceland

Rainbow over Sandvatn
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 
Last light on Sellandafjall seen from Sandvatn, Iceland

Day’s end
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 

Our location made possible the following unusual composition of two great icons together in one frame: Herðubreið, Queen of the Icelandic mountains, at least 50 Kms away, and the graceful arc of Sellandafjall.

Herðubreið and part of Sellandafjall seen from Sandvatn, Iceland

Herðubreið and Sellandafjall
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 

Earlier in the evening, we enjoyed a fluid tableau of beautiful reflections.

Sellandafjall, early evening, Iceland

Sellandafjall, early evening
5DS, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
 
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A spectacular drive.

A section of the precarious route to Borgarfjörður Eystri in the Eastfjords of Iceland passes along a scree often prone to rockslides. The drone makes this type of compositions possible.

Borgarfjarðarvegur to Borgarfjörður Eystri, Iceland

Borgarfjarðarvegur
DJI Phantom 4 Pro

 
Borgarfjarðarvegur to Borgarfjörður Eystri, Iceland

Along the scree’s edge: Njarðvíkurskriður
DJI Phantom 4 Pro

 
 
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Precious heritage.

Ganesh Chathurthi 2017 falls on Friday, Aug 25. Festival greetings to all!

A 30 mins trek through a forest in the remote village of Caranzol-Sattari in Goa leads to the remarkable sight of a grove sheltering an ancient sculpture of Ganesha along with a Shivalinga and Nandi cheek by jowl. These are most likely from the Chalukyan era of over 1000 years ago.

I would like to thank the Goan environmentalist, researcher, author, and Sattari expert, Rajendra Kerkar, for bringing these treasures to my attention. We were guided to the spot by Sachin Gawde, a local, and the village dog (whose name I forgot to record).

Ancient Ganesha idol in "Lingachi Moli', Caranzol, Goa

Ancient Ganesha in Caranzol, Goa
5DS, 100-400L IS II

 
Ancient Ganesh idol in "Lingachi Moli', Caranzol, Goa

Linga, Ganesha, Nandi
5DS, 24-70L f/2.8 II

 
Ancient Ganesh idol in "Lingachi Moli', Caranzol, Goa

Lingachi Moli – Grove of the Shivalinga
5DS, 24-70L f/2.8 II

 
Sachin Gawde at Lingachi Moli, Caranzol, Goa

Our guides: Caranzol local Sachin Gawde and the village dog
5DS, 24-70L f/2.8 II

 
 
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  • Mervyn - August 24, 2017 - 1:23 pm

    Pretty impressive carvings – considering their age. I understand that the religious will be unable to remove the carvings from this spot. The question I have is, what prevents others from taking these statues away?ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - August 24, 2017 - 5:11 pm

      Yes, they are vulnerable to theft. Their location is relatively remote and few know of their existence.ReplyCancel

  • Premanand - August 24, 2017 - 5:18 am

    Gaṇapati Bappa Morya!!!!ReplyCancel

  • Nandkumar Mukund Kamat - August 24, 2017 - 1:19 am

    महागणपती हे आमचे कुलदैवत. चांदोरच्या भोज राजवटीन गणेशमूर्ती गोयांत पावल्यो. तांत्रिक संप्रदायनी गणेशपूजा लोकप्रिय केली. सत्तरीतलो कुंटोळ. करंझोळ ही गांवा एके काळार थइंच्या व्यापारी मार्गाक लागून खूप घणघणताली. मागिर अरीष्टा येवन ती निर्मनुष्य झाली. हांगा रानात शेकड्यांनी शिल्पा आसात. काय शिल्पा बाटाबाटीच्या काळांत लोकांनी ह्या रानात हाडून दवारील्ल्यो आसू येता.डोतोर राजनान काडील्या फोटोवेल्यान ही शिल्पा बदामी चालुक्यकालीन म्हळयार इसवी सन 527 ते 700 मेरेनच्यो दिसता. तांचेर उत्तर भारतीय गुप्त मूर्तीशिल्पाचो प्रभाव आसा. In short the Ganesh sculpture in this image is dated to Vedic cult and Saivaite pantheon promoter Chalukyas of Badami who ruled this area from AD 5-700. The very fact that these idols lie and many similar are found scattered in deep forests of Kumtol and Caranzol indicates that the ancient trade route passing through the village and connecting the Mahadayai river basin to Deccan markets via Bhimgadh was once a major route of communication because Lord Ganesha is favourite deity of Hindu and Jain traders and merchant guilds. They used this route. Sattari including Khanapur area was once a tribal republic called MALAVA exterminated by the Kadambas of Goa. They took the title “slayers of Malavas-the hilly tribals” in their minted coinage.
    Happy Ganesh to Dr. Rajan and family.ReplyCancel

    • Rajan Parrikar - August 24, 2017 - 1:31 am

      Thank you, Professor Kamat, for adding historical details. Festival greetings to you, too.ReplyCancel