Narkasur – The Prince of Darkness

The Hindu festival of Diwali (Deepavali) has multiple interpretations, all having their basis in the triumph of virtue over vice.

One version tells of the vile Narkasur, embodiment of the forces of darkness (tamas), ignorance (avidya) and baseness (adharma). The puranas recount his comeuppance at the hands of Krishna who deployed the sudarshan-chakra to behead the fiend. Narkasur‘s vanquishment lead to the restoration of dharma, and the Diwali celebrations represent a renewal of the memory of Krishna‘s triumphal moment.

In Goa is prevalent the quaint practice – perhaps unique in India – of the reenactment of the Narkasur mythos. On the eve of Diwali, effigies of Narkasur are mounted at village squares and towns. After a night of boisterous revelry, they are consigned to flames at dawn. In recent years, the merriment has assumed comical proportions with an explosion in the count of Narkasurs on display (perhaps an apt allegory of the times).

As a boy I looked forward to the Narkasur Nite, and the preparations in the days leading to it animated us little fellas. Although much has changed since those days, the spirit of the event persists. These photographs were taken in 2007.

My little nephew Yash prepping his Narkasur<br>5D, 24-105L

My little nephew Yash prepping his Narkasur
5D, 24-105L

 
 
My nephew & niece and their friends<br>5D, 24-105L

My nephew & niece and their friends
5D, 24-105L

 
 
Narkasur in Khandola, Goa<br>5D, 24-105L

Narkasur in the village of Khandola, Goa
5D, 24-105L

 
 
Narkasur in Bhatlem, Panjim, Goa<br>5D, 24-105L

Narkasur in Bhatlem, Panjim, Goa
5D, 24-105L

 
 
Narkasur in Santa Ines, Panjim, Goa<br>5D, 24-105L

Narkasur in Santa Ines, Panjim, Goa
5D, 24-105L

 
 
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