These are scenes of Foss á Síðu, a waterfall and farm framed against towering cliffs near the village of Kirkjubæjarklaustur in south Iceland. The first two images were made in the summer when the landscape is lush green. The final monochrome photograph was shot on an autumn morning, in very different lighting conditions.

Foss á Síðu

Foss á Síðu
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
The farm at Foss á Síðu

Farm at Foss á Síðu
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Towering cliffs at Foss á Síðu

Macroscian landscape
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
 
Facebook|Twitter|Google+|Email|Subscribe|RSS|Top
  • Thomas Pindelski - October 15, 2011 - 10:46 am

    The monochrome totally captures the rugged feel. Hope you are printing these!ReplyCancel

These images made at daybreak on the Chapora river in the Goan village of Colvale exude an air of serenity. Mornings here are indeed refreshingly calm and punctuated by birdsong. But they also reveal a dark side. Seen on the canoes are the hordes of migrant labour brought in by the criminals builders to service Goa‘s destruction construction boom. This sand mining of the river bed has already destroyed the fragile riparian ecology.

Mornin' on River Chapora

Mornin' on River Chapora, Goa
5D Mark II, 135L

 
Mining sand

Sand mining
5D Mark II, 135L

 
Colvale on River Chapora

Colvale
5D Mark II, 135L

 
 
Facebook|Twitter|Google+|Email|Subscribe|RSS|Top
  • Con - October 12, 2011 - 6:36 am

    A perfect picture of the dewy-misty morn on the river.

    Yes, Goa is beautiful for the early morning riser!ReplyCancel

These are images of Nirmalabai Jadhav made one late evening in Korgaon in north Goa. She was crossing the village square when I first noticed her. When I went up and asked if she would agree to a portrait, she was moved to tears.

Nirmala Jadhav of Korgaon, Goa

Nirmala Jadhav of Korgaon, Goa
5D Mark II, 135L

 
Crossing the street in Korgaon

Crossing the street
5D Mark II, 135L

 
Nirmalabai

Nirmalabai
5D Mark II, 135L

 
 
Facebook|Twitter|Google+|Email|Subscribe|RSS|Top
  • kiwigram - October 23, 2011 - 12:46 pm

    Image 3 is just magnificent. Seldom do you see such definition in such a close-up. Wonderful.ReplyCancel

  • Sanjeev - October 10, 2011 - 1:31 pm

    # 3 brings out tears in my eyes.

    absolutely top class !ReplyCancel

  • Jon - October 10, 2011 - 9:15 am

    Your photos shed some light on the life she has lived. Otherwise I could not even imagine. Thank you!ReplyCancel

In the Valþjófsdal valley in Önundarfjörður in the Westfjords of Iceland. Originally built in 1886, the church was redone in 1978.

Kirkjuból í Valþjófsdal

Kirkjuból í Valþjófsdal
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
 
Facebook|Twitter|Google+|Email|Subscribe|RSS|Top
  • Suresh - October 9, 2011 - 12:44 am

    Lovely color combination. The small piece of snow on the mountain adds charm to the photograph.ReplyCancel

  • Thomas Pindelski - October 8, 2011 - 10:17 pm

    Rajan – Lovely image, thank you.

    I routinely use perspective correction in PS to fix the fact that I seem genetically incapable of holding my camera plane to subjects which require that, but I could use some education on what TS lens technology adds. Care to expand on the issue on your blog? Does the limited control in DSLR TS lenses (no film plane tilt, limited lens tilt and shift) really justify the cost and trouble?ReplyCancel

    • Rajan P. Parrikar - October 9, 2011 - 2:19 am

      Thomas,

      I shall get to the topic of Tilt-Shift on my blog sometime. In addition to keeping the vertical lines vertical, I find that the Shift function affords a good deal of flexibility in composing a scene even when retention of vertical lines is not critical to the composition – such as when you want more of the foreground or obversely, more of the sky in a composition, without tilting the lens up or down.

      As for Tilt – the Canon 17mm and 24mm lenses provide plenty of movement to bring the ground plane (it is a wedge, really) in focus. For the 17mm lens, less than a millimetre of tilt suffices from my full tripod height to get ‘infinite’ depth of field. For the 24mm lens it is just over 1 mm.ReplyCancel