The tiny settlement of Bíldudalur in the Westfjords region of Iceland is serviced by Eagle Air Iceland that connects it to the capital Reykjavík. The airstrip is laid out in the picturesque setting of the nearby fjord Fossfjörður. This sequence of the Jetstream 32 aircraft taking off was shot from the road that runs right by the airstrip.

Boarding at the Bíldudalur airstrip

Boarding at the Bíldudalur airport
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Engines spool up

Engines spool up
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
Rotation

Rotation
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
Airborne in Fossfjörður

Airborne in Fossfjörður
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
And off they go

Off to Reykjavík (35 mins)
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
 
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  • Jon - September 28, 2011 - 9:00 am

    What was your shutter speed? The propellers appear to be stopped when I know they are turning at 2500 rpm at least. Amazing!ReplyCancel

    • Rajan P. Parrikar - September 28, 2011 - 12:07 pm

      The shutter speed varied between 1/2000 and 1/1600. It was a murky morning with a lot of cloud cover, and so I increased the ISO to 400. Furthermore, I was close enough to the airstrip that the relative speed of the aircraft necessitated a higher shutter speed.ReplyCancel

Another installment in our ongoing monsoon romance.

Classic monsoon squall in Batim

Classic monsoon squall in Batim
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Bovine conference in Batim

Bovine conference in Batim
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Rubber plantation in Vichundrem

Rubber plantation in Vichundrem
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
Herder at Gaodongrim in Canacona

Herder at Gaodongrim, Canacona
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 
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  • yash kamat - October 18, 2011 - 11:23 am

    WOW!!!!!These photos are really good.ReplyCancel

  • jc - September 22, 2011 - 6:41 am

    RP, once again ….Thanks.

    While I enjoyed the greenery of the rice fields, the pic of the rubber plantation is awesome for its clarity. Speaks volumes for the camera and the person behind the camera.ReplyCancel

  • Con - September 21, 2011 - 7:47 pm

    Thank you Rajan,
    As usual superb photography.
    Once again bringing Goan monsoon greenery into our homes.
    ConReplyCancel

  • Thomas Pindelski - September 21, 2011 - 5:42 pm

    Classic pictures, beautifully composed and rendered.ReplyCancel

  • S.Suresh - September 21, 2011 - 2:46 pm

    Wow. I love the first and the last picture a lot. Especially the last one. Wonderful expression on his face.ReplyCancel

For over 1000 years, the Icelandic sheep has remained a pure breed. Raised wholly on natural mountain grass and without hormones, the quality of Icelandic wool and lamb meat is rated to be the finest in the world. The annual sheep roundup in September, known as réttir, is an important cultural tradition, an occasion for both work and celebration, where families and friends gather on farms all over the country to participate in the ritual to track down, corral and sort the animals.

Traffic jam on the Ring Road near Höfn

Traffic jam on the Ring Road near Höfn
5D Mark II, 24-105L

 
Herding sheep on the Ring Road near Höfn

Herding sheep on the Ring Road near Höfn
5D Mark II, 24-105L

 
Curious - at Núpsstaður

Curious - at Núpsstaður
5D Mark II, 24-105L

 
Icelandic lamb - at Gerði

Icelandic lamb - at Gerði
5D Mark II, 85L II

 
The annual autumn roundup - at Skaftartungur

The annual autumn roundup - at Skaftartungur
5D Mark II, 70-200L f/2.8 IS II

 
 
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  • Dewi Sant - September 19, 2011 - 7:12 pm

    Brilliant photos of a totally “Off the wall” subject, Rajan. Thoroughly enjoyed looking at them

    DewiReplyCancel

  • Jon - September 18, 2011 - 10:30 pm

    Is that an actual tree in Curious? Isn’t it huge by Icelandic standards? Just making fun,of course, but the quality and composition of your photographs gives me something to strive for.ReplyCancel

  • Börkur Hrólfsson - September 18, 2011 - 6:06 pm

    The ,,curious” SHEEP ! is my favorite, and the one at the bottom.
    The roundups are on full swing these days, and ,,rettir” every weekend now for the next three weeks.ReplyCancel

  • Arun - September 18, 2011 - 3:20 pm

    The last 3 are especially good.

    I wonder if the Icelanders have thought of growing Cashmere:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cashmere_woolReplyCancel

  • S.Suresh - September 18, 2011 - 3:00 pm

    Loved the curious goat picture. Fantastic.ReplyCancel

The Church of St Anne, located in the village of Talaulim not far from Panjim, is the most imposing church in Goa. Its architectural style is classified as Indian Baroque (vide Churches of Goa by José Pereira, Oxford University Press, 2002), and was conceived by Father Francisco do Rego who traced his roots to a Brahmin family from nearby Neura. Construction began in 1681 and was completed in 1695 (after do Rego’s death).

Known locally as Santana, the Church of St Anne celebrates its annual feast – the Cucumber Fest – at the end of July. For decades the monument had been in a state of severe disrepair and following a heavy downpour in 2007, a portion of the structure caved in. Reconstruction and restoration were then initiated with funds made available by the state government.

These images were taken this July soon after completion of the repairs.

Church of St Anne (1681) in Talaulim, Goa

Church of St Anne (1681) in Talaulim, Goa
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
Santana of Talaulim

Santana of Talaulim
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 100 f/2 Makro Planar

 

Update: The image above can be easily modified in Photoshop CS5 using its powerful Content-Aware Fill tool to remove the palm trees obstructing the view of the church. The result after 3 minutes of work is the following:

Santana of Talaulim - with palm trees removed

Santana of Talaulim - with palm trees removed

 
 
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  • Bosco - September 28, 2011 - 11:54 pm

    Its surprising that the church’s facade is not clattered with an errant lamp post installed to disturb the symmetry or a cluster of cables of an assorted variety that are often found strung across or from such elegant edifices. Or did Adobe do the trick, again? Any info if the cracks developed within the belfry in 2007 have been repaired at this monument that made UNESCO’s World Heritage list? Perhaps a number of Goan monuments will go down the St. Augustine way in the not too distant future.ReplyCancel

    • Rajan P. Parrikar - September 29, 2011 - 12:26 am

      Bosco,

      The renovation job had been completed just a day or two before I got there. I am sure they will soon find ways to soil the uncluttered simplicity that currently prevails. Yes, all the 2007 damages have been repaired.ReplyCancel

  • Mervyn Lobo - September 17, 2011 - 11:22 pm

    Excellent pictures.
    I have never seen Goa during the monsoons, these shades of green are almost unreal.ReplyCancel

  • Arun - September 17, 2011 - 3:57 pm

    The incredible verdure of the Goa pictures makes a contrast to the stark rock of Iceland.ReplyCancel

  • chris - September 17, 2011 - 11:25 am

    I did not know of Talaulim or St. Anne’s Church, though Neura is next to Malar (Divar) so it must be in that vicinity. It is indeed a beautiful church and I hope they will continue to maintain it. The photography, as usual, is brilliant — and thanks for the education, Rajan…ReplyCancel

  • David Bell - September 17, 2011 - 8:41 am

    I like your work with the 24 MM T&S lensReplyCancel

  • jc - September 17, 2011 - 5:14 am

    Once again, RP ….lovely greenery in your photographs. Tks for sharing.ReplyCancel

Tributary of the river Tungnaá fed by multiple cascades at Sigöldugljúfur (gljúfur = canyon) in the southern Highlands of Iceland.

Fögrufossar at Sigöldugljúfur

Fögrufossar at Sigöldugljúfur
5D Mark II, TS-E 24L II

 
Sigöldugljúfur

Sigöldugljúfur
5D Mark II, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 Makro Planar

 
 
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  • Arun - September 15, 2011 - 8:01 am

    Lovely!

    Assuming the same post-processing, the Zeiss aspires to the TS-E 24L II sharpness.ReplyCancel

  • Sanjeev - September 14, 2011 - 10:54 pm

    Beautiful. Looks almost 3D !!,ReplyCancel

  • Taimur Khan - September 14, 2011 - 7:39 pm

    Kya baat hai, Rajan Bhai!ReplyCancel

  • Börkur Hrólfsson - September 14, 2011 - 7:02 pm

    Beautiful place, and beautiful photos !ReplyCancel