Another magical evening.

In 2010 I experienced an enchanting evening at the Trona Pinnacles. On my visit in December 2012, I was witness to another equally engrossing spectacle.

My posts at the Trona Pinnacles are archived here.

From: Death Valley and the Northern Mojave by William C. Tweed and Lauren Davis (Cachuma Press, 2003)

As dawn approaches, the Trona Pinnacles emerge like a dream landscape from the parched bed of Searles Lake. The silhouettes of over 500 strangely shaped towers cluster together against a vast plain rimmed with distant hills. Old-timers call it Cathedral City, an apt name for such a mysterious looking place.

Although it may be hard to imagine, the Trona Pinnacles once protruded from the bottom of a deep lake. During the ice ages that occurred between 10,000 and 100,000 years ago, runoff from the Sierra Nevada periodically coursed into Searles Lake…The pinnacles consist of an unusual “rock” called tufa. It resembles limestone and forms entirely underwater…

…From a distance Searles Lake looks like any other Mojave Desert salt pan. But this playa is different: its deep lakebed sediments contain 98 of the approximately 112 elements.

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Trona Pinnacles in Searles Lake, Mojave Desert, California
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Shadow play
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 II IS

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Tufa candles
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 II IS

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Last light on the Slate Range
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 II IS

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Moonrise
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 II IS

 
Trona Pinnacles, Mojave Desert, California

Belt of Venus
5D Mark III, 70-200L f/2.8 II IS

 
 
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  • Strange Pinnacles | Susegaad - September 8, 2015 - 11:45 pm

    […] on Interstate 75 near Findlay, OH. The first thing to come to my mind on seeing these were the Trona Pinnacles. My best guess is that this was a soil/earth dump and overnight rains must have caused these […]ReplyCancel

  • Mervyn Lobo - December 1, 2013 - 9:10 am

18th C mansion in a Goan village.

See this account for historical details.

Furtado House in Chinchinim, Goa Furtado House in Chinchinim, Goa

Furtado House in Chinchinim, Goa

Furtado House in Chinchinim, Goa
5D Mark III, TS-E 24L II

 
 
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  • Olive - November 24, 2013 - 1:45 pm

    Wow! Such a magnificent house! I wonder if the owners are still alive. I mean the one who had the inspiration for this construction.ReplyCancel

  • Professor Osborn Viegas - November 24, 2013 - 10:52 am

    This is simply wonderful. It may raise eyebrows in certain quarters but it does give the average Goan an idea of what he also can aspire to.
    Let incentive and innovation thrive and dismiss any other hereditary claims to superiority!

    Cheers!

    Osborn ViegasReplyCancel

  • Augusto Pinto - November 24, 2013 - 7:56 am

    This house is magnificent no doubt. But its very magnifcence speaks volumes about itself: “Look at me! I am so great, so wonderful. Can you see my size? Do you realize how much wealth my owners have? Do you know how many mundkars are requiired to take care of me? Look at me and marvel!” Today when I see such houses I marvel and say to myself: “Wow! How do these owners manage to take care of these white elephants!?”ReplyCancel

Aurora Borealis.

I have become blasé about photographing the Northern Lights. It takes now a compelling foreground and an equally compelling intensity in the heavens to get me excited. A few days ago in Mývatn (north Iceland), we had finished dinner when we espied a faint flicker in the skies. Soon there were intense plumes of green overhead and the show was on. We couldn’t resist, and planted our tripods on the edge of the lake.

For my photos of the lights in the years past, see this.

Northern Lights in Mývatn, Iceland

Northern Lights in Mývatn, Iceland
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 15 f/2.8 Distagon

 
Northern Lights in Mývatn, Iceland

Celestial plumes
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 15 f/2.8 Distagon

 
 
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  • Mervyn - November 23, 2013 - 10:12 am

    Good stuffReplyCancel

  • Premanand - November 23, 2013 - 12:25 am

    Your arsenal of lenses is going from strength to strength. Congrats! One question, why did you use this specific lens here? My guess is the “ultrawide” feature of this lens. Am I right/wrong?

     

    The Zeiss 15 is ultrawide, yes, plus it has a maximum aperture of f/2.8, plus it has a hard infinity stop which makes focusing easier in pitch dark conditions. And of course, it offers superb optical performance. – RPReplyCancel

  • gautam - November 22, 2013 - 3:57 pm

    Awesome !!!!ReplyCancel

  • Sanjeev - November 22, 2013 - 11:45 am

    Most enviable !!!

    fabulous

    Havent they already bestowed Icelandic citizenship on you 🙂ReplyCancel

Batman mountain.

At 454 m high, Vesturhorn (also spelled Vestrahorn) is a gabbro with steep cliffs (see Living Earth – Outline of the Geology of Iceland by Ari Trausti Guðmundsson, published by Forlagið, Reykjavík, 2013). It is often called “Batman Mountain” (see second image below).

The sunset at Stokksnes last week was memorable. This headland in southeast Iceland served as a base for a radar station operated by the United States military during the Cold War.

Vestrahorn seen from Stokksness

Vesturhorn at sunset, seen from Stokksnes, southeast Iceland
5D Mark III, TS-E 24L II

 
Vestrahorn seen from Lónsvík

Vesturhorn seen from Lónsvík
5D Mark III, 100-400L IS

 
 
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  • gai - July 22, 2015 - 8:48 am

    How to go to Vesturhorn Mountain ? Ohhh , It’s very nice.
    May i have gps coordinates to me.

    Thank you.ReplyCancel

  • Yash Kamat - November 26, 2013 - 10:46 pm

    Wow! I Like The First Photo!ReplyCancel

  • Arun - November 19, 2013 - 10:07 am

    Very dramatic!ReplyCancel

  • Börkur Hrólfsson - November 19, 2013 - 4:01 am

    Wow ! I like those colors !ReplyCancel

Sweet light, arresting cloudscape.

A spectacular late evening show on my Keflavík to Seattle flight from the window of Icelandair’s 757-200 a couple of days back.

Starboard Rolls Royce engine on Icelandair 757-200

Starboard Rolls Royce engine of Icelandair’s 757-200
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
Sweet light on Icelandair 757-200 wing

Sweet light on Icelandair 757-200 wing
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 

Clouds catch fire Clouds catch fire

Clouds catch fire

Clouds catch fire
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 

Descent into Seattle

Descent into Seattle

Descent into Seattle
5D Mark III, Zeiss ZE 50 f/2 MP

 
 
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