The quaint village of Siolim in northern Goa stirs to life as the first rays of the sun irradiate the waters of River Chapora.

Sunrise in Siolim

Sunrise in Siolim
5D, 300L f/4 IS

 
 
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  • Ratnadeep - June 12, 2012 - 2:25 pm

    aapla nisarg faar sunder aahe, faar chaan…..ReplyCancel

  • […] The present post features images made earlier this month from the bridge on River Chapora in Siolim. This is a magical locale, one that I have staked out numerous times. As the position of the sun changes through the year, so do the crepuscular atmospherics leading into sunrise. February mornings bring low hanging mist to the terrain. For a different take from another time of the year, see this. […]ReplyCancel

  • Nisha - November 9, 2009 - 12:46 am

    I have crossed the ferry from Siolim to Morjim many times in my childhood and this picture makes me feel very nostalgic. Every picture on this blog speaks to my soul. You photographs are truly an inspiration to me.ReplyCancel

  • sundersingh bg - August 12, 2009 - 4:39 am

    Aaaaaaah!ReplyCancel

  • CHRIS VAZ - August 2, 2009 - 6:23 pm

    You have exceeded all expectations, Rajan! Extremely beautiful.
    Look forward to the next batch…ReplyCancel

  • IN - July 22, 2009 - 5:01 pm

    Evocative beauty!ReplyCancel

  • Arun - July 22, 2009 - 4:59 pm

    Sunaharaa Siolim!ReplyCancel

  • Remo Fernandes - July 22, 2009 - 7:11 am

    You are truly gifted, my friend. You know how to breathe life [and magic] into a photograph.ReplyCancel

  • Auusto Pinto - July 22, 2009 - 5:02 am

    Wow! How did you capture that colour!ReplyCancel

  • joel ds - July 22, 2009 - 3:54 am

    Beautiful shade for the Chapora waters.ReplyCancel

  • colin dsouza - July 22, 2009 - 1:45 am

    Fantastic Photography and a beautiful place. Sadly I dont belong to that place anymore. Its a one of its kind villages in My Beautiful Goa. LOve you Siolim.ReplyCancel

  • Michael Ali - July 21, 2009 - 11:58 pm

    Beautiful….just beautiful.

    I was in Siolim in December 2006. Its a beautiful place.

    Warm regards,

    Mike
    White Plains, NYReplyCancel

  • Prashant - July 21, 2009 - 10:57 pm

    Take a bow, Rajan !ReplyCancel

  • Sanjeev - July 21, 2009 - 10:44 pm

    The backdrop is spectacular ! as if a water colourReplyCancel

  • con - July 21, 2009 - 10:18 pm

    A Masterpiece, Rajan!!ReplyCancel

  • Anita - July 21, 2009 - 8:34 pm

    Picture perfect! Can’t believe its for real!!!!!ReplyCancel

  • VM - July 21, 2009 - 8:25 pm

    moody, beautiful photo. kudos.ReplyCancel

  • JC - July 21, 2009 - 8:08 pm

    That is a strange colour for sunrise. I must say, I have never seen those colours at sunrise.ReplyCancel

  • Chinmay - July 21, 2009 - 7:58 pm

    very nice picture..the man walking over what looks like a sandbar makes it appear kind of surreal…ReplyCancel

Dark monsoon clouds hang low on the Western Ghats overlooking the 12th C Mahadeva (Shiva) temple in the village of Tambdi Surla, Goa. Many great Goan temples were destroyed by the Portuguese but this exquisitely carved gem, set in a remote jungle clearing, escaped unscathed probably because of its isolation. It is today the oldest surviving temple in Goa.

Mahadeva Temple in Tambdi Surla, Goa <br>5D, 24-105L

Mahadeva Temple in Tambdi Surla, Goa
5D, 24-105L

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  • […] See this earlier entry for another view of the temple.     […]ReplyCancel

  • Felix Fernandes - July 17, 2009 - 11:49 pm

    Just beautiful! Thanks!ReplyCancel

  • Mervyn Lobo - July 17, 2009 - 7:33 pm

    A beautiful temple
    A beutiful setting
    A beautiful pictureReplyCancel

  • Arun - July 17, 2009 - 2:57 pm

    Yes! I’d like to see this on a full-gamut monitor.ReplyCancel

  • Thaths - July 17, 2009 - 6:29 am

    Beautiful saturation on this photo. The greens are as if shot on Velvia.ReplyCancel

The southwest monsoons along India’s Konkan and Malabar coast are now in full flow. Those who live in this region of western India enjoy the verdant lushness that blankets the land at this time of the year. This is wild, opulent green that we are talking about, heightened by the diffuse lighting provided by cloud cover.

In 2007 I had the pleasure of photographing an entire monsoon season in Goa, and a small slice of it in Kerala. This is the first installment of a monsoon-themed sequence. To us Goans, the monsoon is not merely a season. It is a state of mind, a feeling. I shall try to convey that complex of emotions and aesthetic through these photographs.

Outdoor well in Porvorim, Goa<br>5D, 70-200L f/2.8 IS

Outdoor well in Porvorim, Goa
5D, 70-200L f/2.8 IS

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  • Sanjeev - July 21, 2009 - 10:36 am

    Hey Rajan, When are you coming ? Goa is just like this now…ReplyCancel

  • Arun - July 9, 2009 - 3:59 am

    The humidity! I can feel it.

    That little arch of brown near the middle of the frame is a bit of a distraction.ReplyCancel

The magnificent Church of St. Estevem in Goa lights up the eponymous village along the River Mandovi. It was founded in 1575, and destroyed twice by the Marathas, before the current structure assumed its final form in 1759. The church features a “cupoliform façade with prominent drum and lantern” and is built in the “Mannerist style with Baroque features.” (vide The Parish Churches of Goa by José Lourenço, Amazing Goa Publications, 2006.)

The village of St. Estevem also goes by the name Jua.

Church of St. Estevem<br>5D, 24-105L

Church of St. Estevem
5D, 24-105L

 
The joys of village life, St. Estevem<br>5D, 24-105L

The joys of village life, St. Estevem
5D, 24-105L

 
 
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  • Mervyn Lobo - July 17, 2009 - 7:38 pm

    The details on this picture are something else. It almost takes you back to a different time…..ReplyCancel

  • Arun - July 5, 2009 - 2:05 pm

    Something about the architecture of the building leaves me a little cold.

    Photographically, the 24-105 doesn’t seem to have any of its usual distortion. Have you done any distortion corrections in post-processing?ReplyCancel